Category Archives: 3arabi

London’s Muslim Girl Power!

A recent visit to the corner Barnes & Noble store led me to a cozy corner near the magazine section where I picked up a copy of Swindle Magazine.

I love this magazine for their great artwork and neat articles. I happened to be drawn to this issue in particular because of the cover.

JULY SWINDLE

JULY SWINDLE

The issue focuses upon the city’s absorption of a rising Muslim population—and we feature the young Islamic artist Sarah Maple.

Here is an excerpt:

If you want to see where London’s future lies, look to its Muslim demographic. Today, about 40% of Britain’s Muslim population resides in London, where they make up just below 10% of the residents. And half of the city’s Muslim population is under 24—the youngest age profile in the capital. According to the BBC, over half of all British Muslims were born in the U.K., making this subgroup an increasingly intrinsic part of British society. “We’re the second generation, we’ve grown up here like the kids around us and we haven’t faced the strains most of our elders felt such as not understanding English,” says Warsan Nur, a 19-year-old anthropology student at the University of London, and aspiring journalist. “Racism isn’t so common because people are growing to accept us, so the possibilities for this Muslim generation are endless.”

Fore more visit: http://swindlemagazine.com/issue16/

Leave a comment

Filed under 3arabi, Culture, Current Events, Diaspora, Euro, Glossies (Mags), Hijaab, Islam, Life, London, Media, News, Thoughts, World

My Summer Smoothie Recipe!

 As the summer weather creeps in I have a recipe for a smoothie that I think everyone can enjoy! It’s refreshing, but not for those who are afraid of a little spice! It includes cantaloupe, honey, milk, yogurt, and cardamom.

I’m sure most readers of my blog are familiar with heyl (cardomom), for those of you who aren’t it’s a seed that most Arabs, East and North Africans, and South Asians use with tea or coffee and sometimes dessert!

For this smoothie depending on your taste you can grind the cardamom seeds for more impact or just drop in the seeds. Mind you, might get seeds in your drink that way. For someone who has never had cardamom seeds it might be a bit overwhelming.

Blend cantaloupe, cardamom, honey, milk, and yogurt for about 3 minutes and voila you have a tasty treat!

Be sure to take seeds out of the cantaloupe when cut into. And you can save whatever you don’t use in your fridge.

Enjoy!

1 Comment

Filed under 3arabi, Africa, Asians, Brunch, Djibouti, Health, Middle East, Recipe, Somali, Thoughts

British Airways: True Story

  

This was a scene that took place on a British Airways flight between Johannesburg, South Africa & London.
A white woman, about 50 years old, was seated next to a
black man.

Very disturbed by this, she called the air hostess. “You
obviously do not see it then?” she asked. “You placed me next to a black man. I did not agree to sit next to someone from such a repugnant group. Give me an alternative seat.”


“Be calm please,” the hostess replied.
“Almost all the places on this flight are taken. I will go to
see if another place is available.”

The hostess went away & then came back a few minutes later.

“Madam, just as I thought, there are no other available seats in Economy Class.

I spoke to the captain & he informed me that there is also
no seat in Business Class. All the same, we still have one place in First Class.”

Before the woman could say anything, the hostess continued.
“It is unusual for our company to permit someone from Economy Class to sit in First Class. However, given the circumstances, the captain feels that it would be scandalous to make someone sit next to someone so disgusting.”

She turned to the black guy & said:

 “Therefore, Sir, if you would like to, please collect your hand luggage, a seat awaits you in First Class.”

At that moment, the other passengers, who’d been shocked by what they had just witnessed, stood up & applauded.

This is a true story that happened recently.

If you have any interesting stories such as these send them to me or reply to this post!

2 Comments

Filed under 3arabi, Africa, Colorism, Culture, Current Events, Discrimination, Euro, Life, London, News, Racism, Racist, Thoughts, Travel, World

Languages Die

Languages Die, but Not Their Last Words

Chris Rainier/National Geographic

Charlie Muldunga, right, the last known speaker of Amurdag, with two researchers who are making a record of dying languages, K. David Harrison, left, and Gregory D. S. Anderson

Published: September 19, 2007

Of the estimated 7,000 languages spoken in the world today, linguists say, nearly half are in danger of extinction and likely to disappear in this century. In fact, one falls out of use about every two weeks. 

Some languages vanish in an instant, at the death of the sole surviving speaker. Others are lost gradually in bilingual cultures, as indigenous tongues are overwhelmed by the dominant language at school, in the marketplace and on television.

New research, reported yesterday, has found the five regions where languages are disappearing most rapidly: northern Australia, central South America, North America’s upper Pacific coastal zone, eastern Siberia, and Oklahoma and the southwestern United States. All have indigenous people speaking diverse languages, in falling numbers.

The study was based on field research and data analysis supported by the National Geographic Society and the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages. The findings are described in the October issue of National Geographic and at languagehotspots.org.

In a teleconference with reporters yesterday, K. David Harrison, an associate professor of linguistics at Swarthmore, said that more than half the languages had no written form and were “vulnerable to loss and being forgotten.” Their loss leaves no dictionary, no text, no record of the accumulated knowledge and history of a vanished culture.

Beginning what is expected to be a long-term project to identify and record endangered languages, Dr. Harrison has traveled to many parts of the world with Gregory D. S. Anderson, director of the Living Tongues Institute, in Salem, Ore., and Chris Rainier, a filmmaker with the National Geographic Society.

The researchers, focusing on distinct oral languages, not dialects, interviewed and made recordings of the few remaining speakers of a language and collected basic word lists. The individual projects, some lasting three to four years, involve hundreds of hours of recording speech, developing grammars and preparing children’s readers in the obscure language. The research has concentrated on preserving entire language families.

In Australia, where nearly all the 231 spoken tongues are endangered, the researchers came upon three known speakers of Magati Ke in the Northern Territory, and three Yawuru speakers in Western Australia. In July, Dr. Anderson said, they met the sole speaker of Amurdag, a language in the Northern Territory that had been declared extinct.

“This is probably one language that cannot be brought back, but at least we made a record of it,” Dr. Anderson said, noting that the Aborigine who spoke it strained to recall words he had heard from his father, now dead.

Many of the 113 languages in the region from the Andes Mountains into the Amazon basin are poorly known and are giving way to Spanish or Portuguese, or in a few cases, a more dominant indigenous language. In this area, for example, a group known as the Kallawaya use Spanish or Quechua in daily life, but also have a secret tongue mainly for preserving knowledge of medicinal plants, some previously unknown to science.

“How and why this language has survived for more than 400 years, while being spoken by very few, is a mystery,” Dr. Harrison said in a news release.

The dominance of English threatens the survival of the 54 indigenous languages in the Northwest Pacific plateau, a region including British Columbia, Washington and Oregon. Only one person remains who knows Siletz Dee-ni, the last of many languages once spoken on a reservation in Oregon.

In eastern Siberia, the researchers said, government policies have forced speakers of minority languages to use the national and regional languages, like Russian or Sakha.

Forty languages are still spoken in Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico, many of them originally used by Indian tribes and others introduced by Eastern tribes that were forced to resettle on reservations, mainly in Oklahoma. Several of the languages are moribund.

Another measure of the threat to many relatively unknown languages, Dr. Harrison said, is that 83 languages with “global” influence are spoken and written by 80 percent of the world population. Most of the others face extinction at a rate, the researchers said, that exceeds that of birds, mammals, fish and plants.

Leave a comment

Filed under 3arabi, Africa, Art, Asians, Culture, Current Events, Education, Languages, Linguistics, Literature, Middle East, News, Research, Science, Thoughts, World

Ramadan Kariim!!!

4 Comments

Filed under 3arabi, Africa, Art, Culture, Current Events, Islam, Life, Middle East, News, Thoughts, World

Featured Designer: Amsale Aberra (Ethiopian Wedding Gown Designer)

Amsale’s elegant designs have made her the number one couture wedding gown designer in the United States, and won her the reputation as the creator of the modern wedding dress. Though most recognized for her exquisite bridal wear, Amsale has also gained a strong celebrity following for her eveningwear, as seen at the Academy Awards and other high profile events on stars such as Kim Basinger, Salma Hayek, Julianna Marguiles, and Vanessa Williams.

Frustrated by her search for a simple, yet sophisticated gown for her 1985 nuptials to film executive Neil Brown, Amsale designed her own wedding dress. Realizing that many women shared her difficulty finding the “right dress”, Amsale launched her business in 1986 as a designer of fine bridal wear for a select clientele. Her designs gained in popularity as more brides began seeking classic dresses with a modern point-of-view. Today she is known for creating timeless and fashionable gowns that combine luxurious fabrics with fine hand-crafted beading, laces, silk flowers and tailored bows to create a strong, yet feminine look. AMSALE brides radiate style and confidence.
 

According to The Wall Street Journal, Ms. Aberra’s New York-based wedding- and evening-dress house, claims annual sales of about $30 million. The Amsale label is in the same league as Vera Wang, another high-end wedding-gown brand.

Click here to check out her Fall 2007 collection.

Her designs are favorites of Kim Basinger, Salma Hayek, Julianna Marguiles, and Vanessa Williams. For those within the tri-state area, the AMSALE Flagship Salon is located on the east side of Madison Avenue between 58th and 59th streets on the 2nd floor at 625 Madison Avenue.

Amsale also maintains a daily blog called:

 “Simply Chic by Amsale”

Amsale recently launched a line of couture eveningwear. The AMSALE Evening Collection is a natural progression from the classic, yet modern styles of her bridal line and has been featured on the fashion and party pages of Instyle, Harper’s Bazaar, Hello!, Vogue, WWD and W. Amsale’s bridal and evening collections are available at the finest boutiques and specialty retailers nationwide, in Canada and the U.K., and at her Madison Avenue boutique.

4 Comments

Filed under 3arabi, Africa, Art, Culture, Current Events, Customs, Ethiopia, Fashion, Glamour, Horn of Africa, Mode, Style, Thoughts, World

Somali Women and Mirage Sellers

Habone Djama Hassan - article previously published at www.AwdalNews.com

Somali Woman

I am a Somali woman. I am from a tribe: the one I belong to. But that does not make me “tribalist”; I am also the sister to one tribe, cousin to another, mother to a different, and spouse of one more.

The Somali women factor

There was a time that we all believed in the greater Somalia. However the dream is shattered today beyond any possible reparation. Men have killed, looted and have done something unbelievable to the once existing Somali tradition.

Complicity of women

Men raped their own mothers, sisters, daughters and common wealth to all Somali men. We, as women are not innocent of these hideous crimes. We incited those crimes. We asked of our men to revenge us to other women. We did and still doing the King Kong gesture of slapping our chest and citing past clannish grandfathers as heroes. We have pushed and still pushing our beloved men afar. And we did get what we preached, as the old saying goes: women’s will is God’s will. Somali women and men are the origin of their own actions.

The mirage sellers

We tried to reunite the five Somali state in one. One must say we were fooling ourselves. We could not even manage two. But the sad part is even today, many educated men, looking for their interests, want us to buy the old agenda of the Greater Somalia, but are they suffering some kind unnamed undiscovered disease?

The sole foundation of the Greater Somalia was founded on the premise that we should reunite all the Somali territories in one. Ethiopia, Kenya and any other nation that will prevent us was our enemy. We are today competing for the attention of our erstwhile historical enemy, who is present everywhere today in the entire five Somalis region. In Djibouti they are governing them by their economy, in Somaliland they lured them for hope of recognition, and Somalia, shameless, they are invited to kill, rape and destroy their own kind so they can have the upper hand. And it is those vultures that are telling us what to do for our nation?

Reality check

Let’s not become amnesiac! I said that if we have better scores separate than united, then let be so! Djibouti refused the merger with Somaliland and Somalia. And see where they are today…. Sine their separation from Somalia, Somaliland even though unrecognized is not doing badly either. To this latter one, lot is to be done. Unemployment is high, the infrastructures is almost nonexistent. And it needs to secure its borders, but it is doing relatively well.

We are not the only homogeneous nation. We should take the eighteen Arab states as an example. They share, like us; same language, tradition and religion. Each nation kept has its identity, and, lives in harmony with their bothers. And at time of pain, they are all there for each other unlike Djibouti serving her own agenda in the Somali issue.

Setting the records straight

Every Southern Somali and the international community talked about the sixteen years of war, but unlike the other parts of Somalia, the Somalilanders struggle started in 1978, and, not 1991. The only memories of the generations late seventies and until the liberation they experienced fear and genocide perpetrated on their people. They suffered killings, jail, rape, and living in squalid refugee camps in Ethiopia.

The only decent life they ever had is the true one of Somaliland. Do they really believe that they will make the same mistake as their fathers sacrificed their country and people for a reverie? The few old men from Somaliland hallucinating still from a marvelous dream of the Five Somali are fading. And there is absolutely nobody to keep that torch unlighted in this northern part of the five Somali.

So what are the so-called Unionist will do now: call on the Ethiopian to come and unite us all five region by force? And then what is the Ethiopian gaining from that strong union? Let us not be ridiculous!

The question is very simple: What do we really want? A fantasy Somali State or two twin brotherly states that can help each other at times of need?

As women, we are tired to see our kids dying by the thousand! Killed by the bullets of their arch enemies, defenseless in their own territories, vanishing of hunger while their soil is rich. Dying of disease while their doctors are spread throughout the globe. Each Somali life lost is a terrible agony for every Somali woman, that cares, not matter under which flag they are.

5 Comments

Filed under 3arabi, Africa, Clans, Colonialism, Culture, Current Events, Djibouti, Horn of Africa, Life, News, Somali, Somalia, Thoughts, World

HIV Medics Released to Bulgaria

Bulgarian medics arrive in the capital, Sofia

The medics were greeted by tearful relatives and well-wishers

Six Bulgarian medics who  were serving life sentences in Libya have arrived in Bulgaria following their release, ending their eight-year incarceration. They were immediately pardoned by Bulgarian President Georgi Parvanov.

The five nurses and a Palestinian-born doctor were convicted of deliberately infecting Libyan children with HIV – charges they have always denied.

An EU official told the BBC the release had been made possible by a deal struck in Tripoli on improving Libya-EU ties.

It comes after years of efforts by the European Commission, with the EU’s external affairs commissioner, Benita Ferrero-Waldner, making numerous trips to Libya, meeting the prisoners and working to improve the conditions for hundreds of children with HIV/Aids.

The dramatic case with the sentenced innocent Bulgarian citizens is at its end. We are still sympathetic with the other tragedy – the one of the infected Libyan children and their families

Bulgaria’s President Georgi Parvanov

 

Ms Ferrero-Waldner and Cecilia Sarkozy, the wife of France’s President Nicolas Sarkozy, accompanied the Bulgarians home.

On their arrival aboard a French government plane at Sofia airport the medics were greeted on the tarmac by tearful relatives and well-wishers.

Mrs Ferrero-Waldner said she was “filled with joy” and described their release as “a humanitarian decision” and “the right decision”.

She told the BBC it marked “a new page in the history of relations between the EU and Libya”.

French President Nicolas Sarkozy said he would make a “political visit” to Libya on Wednesday to help the country “rejoin the international community”.

Earlier, Mr Sarkozy and European Commission chief Jose Manuel Barroso welcomed the agreement, paying tribute to Ms Ferrero-Waldner, and the mediation of the emir of Qatar.

Archaeological help

According to EU officials the key to the agreement has been a memorandum signed in Tripoli by Ms Ferrero-Waldner, which would lead to the full normalisation of EU relations with Libya.

EU External Affairs Commissioner Benita Ferrero-Waldner

The deal follows years of efforts by Ms Ferrero-Waldner

The BBC’s Oana Lungescu says it includes a pledge to open the European market to Libyan farm and fishery produce, technical assistance for the restoration of archaeological monuments and EU grants for Libyan students.

It also included measures to improve the medical care of the children infected with HIV/Aids in Libya, the French presidential palace said.

Libya said it had ordered the release of the medical workers after it was satisfied that the conditions for extradition had been met.

“The matter has been settled. We received guarantees for the normalisation of relations with European countries and for a partnership agreement with the EU,” a Libyan official told the AFP news agency.

Last week, the six had death sentences commuted to life in prison by Libya’s top legal body.

The High Judicial Council ruling came after the families of the 438 children agreed a compensation deal reportedly worth $1m (£500,000) per child.

Transfer deal

Bulgaria had officially asked Libya to repatriate the medics so they could serve out their sentences in Bulgaria.

Bulgaria’s President Parvanov said he was satisfied with their release.

“The dramatic case with the sentenced innocent Bulgarian citizens is at its end. We are still sympathetic with the other tragedy – the one of the infected Libyan children and their families,” he said.

The Palestinian doctor was granted Bulgarian citizenship last month to allow him to benefit from any transfer deal.

The medics were convicted of deliberately injecting 438 children with HIV-tainted blood. Fifty-six children have since died.

The six, who have been in prison since 1999, say they were tortured to confess.

Foreign experts say the infections started before the medics arrived at the hospital, and are more likely to have been a result of poor hygiene.

Bulgaria, its allies in the European Union, and the United States say Libya has used the case to deflect criticism from its run-down health service.

Leave a comment

Filed under 3arabi, Africa, Current Events, Diplomacy, Euro, Life, Media, News, Thoughts, World

Visit My New Page: Beauty 101

Leave a comment

Filed under 3arabi, Africa, Art, Asians, Culture, Design, Fashion, Glamour, Life, Magazines, Makeup, News, Photos, Products, Somali, Style, Thoughts

Throwback Sunday

This weeks Throwback Sunday brings you: Samira Said & Cheb Mami- Youm Wara Youm

This is not too long ago, but I still feel I should post it…I remember hearing this all the time on the radio on the way to school back AD ( Abu Dhabi).

Enjoy!

4 Comments

Filed under 3arabi, Africa, Art, Culture, Dancing, Fashion, Media, Middle East, Mode, Music, Nostalgia, Reviews, Style, Thoughts, Throwback Sunday, Video, World